Bone Health | 10 Secrets For Physically Fit And Strong Body

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By all means, protecting your Bone Health is easier than you think. First, it’s crucial to understand how our dietary plan, physical activity, and other lifestyle factors affect bone mass. After all, our bones play many roles in the body. For instance, providing structure, protecting organs, anchoring muscles, and storing calcium. Thus, strong bones are part of our fitness.

While building strong and healthy bones during childhood and adolescence is essential, you can also take steps during adulthood to protect bone health. For one thing, minerals are incorporated into your bones during childhood, youth, and early adulthood. And once you reach 30 years of age, you have achieved peak bone mass — no more strands to produce the bone.

If not enough bone mass is created during this time or bone loss occurs later in life, you have an increased risk of developing fragile bones that break easily. Fortunately, many nutrition and lifestyle habits can help you improve your bone health by building and maintaining stronger bones as you age. Osteoporosis weakens bones to the point of breaking easily.

It is called a “silent disease” because people who develop it may not notice any changes until a bone breaks — usually a bone in the hip, spine, or wrist. Fortunately, this guide will teach a few things to help you maintain a healthy bone health lifestyle. But before we can get to that, it’s crucial that we first understand the central role of bones in our physical body wellness.

How Bones Powers Up Our Physical Body And Health Wellness

Firstly, to understand how Osteoporosis weakens our bones, it’s worth mentioning that bones are made of living tissue. A healthy human body breaks down old bone and replaces it with new bone to keep them strong. Moreover, Osteoporosis develops when more bone is broken down than replaced. Medically, the inside of a bone looks something like a honeycomb.

When someone has Osteoporosis, the bone, which forms the “walls” of the honeycomb, gets smaller, and the spaces between the bone grow larger. The outer shell of the bone also gets thinner. All of this makes a bone weaker. In severe cases of Osteoporosis, a simple movement such as a cough or minor bump can result in a broken bone, also called a fracture.

People with osteoporosis also have a more challenging time recovering from broken bones, which can sometimes cause pain that does not go away. Broken hip and spine bones are dire, as these injuries can cause older adults to lose mobility and independence. Although very light, bones are strong enough to support our body weight and help form our shape.

Resource Reference: Bone Broth | 6 Important Benefits To Health + Key DIY Recipe

Besides bones supporting our entire weight, they protect our overall body organs. For instance, the skull protects the brain and forms the shape of the face. The spinal cord — a pathway for messages between the brain and body — is also protected by the backbone (the spinal column). Ribs are part of the intestines and, in women, the reproductive organs.

While by the same token, the ribs — which form a cage that shelters the heart, lungs, and pelvis — help protect the bladder. Bones are made up of a framework of a protein called collagen. And they are rich in a mineral called calcium phosphate that makes the framework hard and robust. Equally important, they also store calcium that rejuvenates the bones in case of injury.

Not forgetting, they release calcium elements into the bloodstream when other body parts need them. The amounts of vitamins and minerals you eat — vitamin D and calcium — directly affect how much calcium is stored in the bones. Be that as it may, in this article, you can read and learn more about Bones, Muscles, and Joints and their primary functions.

Getting To Know The Bone Cells Growth And Development Process 

Bone Density measures the amount of calcium and other minerals in our bones. Clinically, Osteopenia (low bone mass) and Osteoporosis (brittle bones) are conditions characterized by low bone density. A high intake of green and yellow vegetables has been linked to increased bone mineralization during childhood and the maintenance of bone mass in young adults.

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